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since I got an email today from somebody on fineartamerica asking how I make my own textures, I thought maybe somebody else might be interested. Here is what I said back to them:

Thanks for you interest! I do not have a how to do textures tutorial, but I have several blog posts about images that have been made with my own textures. It is super easy and so fun. Anybody who has a macro lens and keeps their eyes open for interesting textures on things can do it. A tripod is helpful sometimes as well.

https://dlmtleart.wordpress.com/2011/05/23/snowflakes-and-a-bit-about-textures/


https://dlmtleart.wordpress.com/2012/10/30/garden-of-the-hesperides-digital-art/


https://dlmtleart.wordpress.com/2012/05/01/old-fashioned-roses-trojan-pond/


https://dlmtleart.wordpress.com/2012/02/27/red-lilies-hares-foot-trefoil-with-red-leaves/


https://dlmtleart.wordpress.com/2011/06/28/marriage-of-titania-salmon-berry-floral-duet/

There is also a tutorial on redbubble I found very helpful in getting started with doing your own textures:
http://blog.redbubble.com/2013/02/how-to-photograph-your-own-textures/

 –although unlike what they recommend I do NOT prefer things with an even or uniform texture. I like finding interesting abstract shapes that inspire my imagination much like Leonardo Davinci taught his students to do by looking for stains on the walls etc and then using those to spark creative and imaginative drawings.

Sometimes after I take the initial texture shots I meld several of them together using layers to get what I am after and edit the color and lighting. These make great backgrounds for stationery also.
This is one I did using the crackled and glittery surface of my bathroom sink after I accidentally spilled gentian violet ALL OVER THE PLACE and then tried to clean it up. This incorporates overlaying several layers of sink texture plus edits to the lighting http://www.redbubble.com/people/dlmtleart/works/11574196-crackle-and-sparkle


…and here it is in a photo manipulation http://fineartamerica.com/featured/dragonfly-leap-of-faith-dawna-morton.html

here is another one where I used a texture from the bottom of my flaking Teflon wok. I use that wok texture a lot because it adds a splash of energy and motion. http://www.redbubble.com/people/dlmtleart/works/10469714-homework-rebellion-girl-reading-horse

Here is one where I used a close up of a bread pan somebody left outside in the bbq all winter. It was gross, but cleaned up and tinted blue etc it is lovely http://www.zazzle.com/cloudy_blue_sky_star_haiku_oval_print-228789702444197489?rf=238567130389714466


This one has as one of many layers an edited version of the infamous gentian violet spill aftermath. When I rinsed out the rags and set them on the edge of the bathtub and squeezed them out we had purple drops, drips, and splashes all over the place. It did eventually come off after a month or so and after using bleach. lol 😉  http://fineartamerica.com/featured/lily-pads-in-the-rain-at-vernonia-lake-dawna-morton.html

This should give you some ideas of the types of things you can keep an eye out for at your home and around town.

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As an artist I constantly have more art than frames handy to hang them in,  so I am constantly on the lookout for inexpensive framing options.

Last year during our neighborhood’s annual yard sale, I managed to pick up this frame –along with a bag of clothes, shoes, and assorted other goodies for a very small donation at one of the churches in town. During the last couple hours of the sale they were selling as much as could be stuffed in a bag for a requested donation for their youth program. The frame  needed some cleaning up, a new back, and a different color of stain to go well with one of my paintings, but it was a great deal.

Frame from a yard sale

close up after some cleaning and sanding

close up after some cleaning and sanding

It looked much better after sanding it down and  cleaning it up with some mineral spirits to prepare it for re-staining.

The frame fit this painting nicely with the addition of a large sheet of mat board leftover from a previous framing project.

another painting I considered putting into this frame

Midsummer Daydream would have looked good in this frame as well, but I decided to frame Michael at the Water Pump instead since it had been waiting to be framed for longer and has more sentimental value.

I also had a large sheet of  foam board on hand  (and by large I mean it just barely fits behind the piano, but it was cheaper in the long run to buy it in that size). In this photo I am laying out the frame on the board to check which direction will give me the best use of the remaining board.

After re-staining it with several layers of Bombay Mahogany (also from another framing project) to get the right shade, and following the directions on the can, I went on with cutting out the mat board and foam board. The frame did not need a top coat, lacquer or shellac, because this was a one step stain.

using the frame to mark a straight line

using the frame to mark a straight line

After measuring the opening carefully (making sure to account for the lip of the frame) and marking my measurements, I used the edge of the frame as a straight edge (lining up the bottom of the frame with the bottom of the board, and the side with my marks.

After repeating this process for the other sides it is time to cut it out with a mat knife. Use a slow steady pressure to avoid problems. It will probably be necessary to make several passes in order to cut all the way through. Once the mat is cut, trace it’s outline onto the foam board, and cut that out using the same slow, steady movement, repeat passes and a little patience.  Next align the painting with one corner, and mark half the distance between the other side and the edge of the mat. Repeat with the opposite corner.Mark 1/8 inch inwards from there, so the mat will overlap your painting slightly, and then cut on those lines.

If the mat board does not fit all the way  in the frame ( and it probably wont if  since it is difficult to keep the blade perfectly perpendicular while cutting), then just shave some very thin strips off any problem areas until it fits snugly. Here are some of mine that just happened to fall in such a way that they look like a sad boy in a funky feathered hat.

Copy  your measurement from the mat to the foam board, place your painting on the foamboard with the painting  lining it up with the lines you previously measured. Use a little acid free tape on the back to hold it in place on the foam board (use the tape to make a T hinge and only attach to the top backside of the painting.–I have been told this is to let the painting expand and contract with the weather without damaging it….) and then set it in the frame to make sure it fits (if you already have some glass or,  preferably in my opinion , UV resistant plexiglass –since it is less likely to break if you have young persons who insist on playing ball in the house etc.–then go ahead and put that in 1st.)

For now I just have mine hanging without the glass, until I get a chance to get some at the local hardware store.

When it came time to hang the picture I did encounter a problem…

the frame leans out far from the wall

The top of the frame leaned a good 3 inches or more from the wall.

The problem was the screws it was hung by stuck too far out  as well as being placed in the in the exact middle of the frame vertically.

The solution was to take out the offending screws and attach the cord much closer to the top, shortening the string considerably.

I did this by stapling it down firmly, pulling the short end up and stapling it again–followed by tying it with a secure knot. Doing this on the first side was relatively easy, but the second side took some trial and error in making sure I did not leave the cord too loose.

For my purposes I wanted the cord slightly above the edge of the frame, to accommodate the hook I was using. This only works because the framed work is relatively lightweight having used plexiglass, and in the long run I will probably need to use an anchor screw instead and adjust the cord shorter. Still, it is a far sight better than hanging the unframed painting up with thumbtacks. ( As a side note here, the tacks go next to rather than into the art. usually two above an two below. My DD once thought she was “helping” by rehanging this painting when it fell off the wall, only she poked a hole in it 😦 luckily it is a water soluble oil rather than watercolor, and I was able to fix it by applying a little glob of matching colored paint on the front and back to fill in the pinhole.)

Now my framed painting hangs flat on the wall, and I only have to get some plexiglass and secure the foam board in with staples to finish the project.

This is what it will look like when it is done.

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Once the frame stained, it was time to secure everything in the back.  I went to the local art supply store and picked up some glazier points and some picture hanging supplies, then when I got them home I discovered a problem.  Because of how narrow the lighter strip of molding was, when the glazier points were pushed in place  they were still visible from the front of the frame. I tried chiseling way some of the wood in back and replacing the points, but this was difficult and not very effective for me.  However, placing the mat in front of the glazier point was much simpler and worked really well to solve the dilemma. The next time I do this I will look for wider molding, or just plan on putting the glazier points behind the mat from the beginning.
The remainder or the framing got put off for a long time after that because my staple gun was broken. Once I replaced that, it was a simple task  to secure the frame backing in place using staples  several inches apart that were left sticking up slightly (it just requires flipping the low/high switch on the staple gun).
Next the framing wire needed attached. The instructions on the one I bought suggested screwing some eyes (from a set of hook and eyes) into each side of the back of the frame and then tying the wire to them; however, because of how thin the molding was there was no room to do that. There was just barely enough room to attach the foam backing IF I pushed in and squished it with the staple gun as it was, so I just tied the wire to two of the staples instead. I think this will work because of how lightweight the frame and the plexiglass are. If It does not work I will have to think of something else. In the meantime I still need to decide where I want to hang it.

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Masking the Frame

Masking the Frame

Last week I decided it was time to pick out the stain for my framing project. So, I took my frame and artwork with me to Home Depot. Choosing the stain took  a long time. There were three different stains I thought might look good with it, but it was hard to tell which would be best based on the little swatches up on the shelf at the store. I finally went up to the paint desk and asked the sales clerk if she had some that I could hold up to the frame. She did have some, but not all 3 of the ones I wanted to see. Finally I chose Bombay Mahogany because it leaned a bit to the purple end of brown which I felt would complement the mat. The other 2 colors I had considered were Red Mahogany and Accents Antique Red. I really liked the antique red, but since it had to be mixed custom, it would not be returnable if I tested it and did not like it. Bombay Mahogany was only available in a 1 step formula (which would have been great except I was planning on leaving part of the frame unstained, and so I needed to put a coat of gloss on anyway).

Checking the Stain On Scrap Wood

Checking the Stain On Scrap Wood

I read all the instructions, and following them I shook the can before I opened it. Using a staining cloth which I already had on hand, I tested it on a small scrap leftover from the frame ( making sure to mask the lighter colored decorative molding first because I wanted to leave that part unstained). After applying 2 coats of stain I held it up next to the mat, deciding I liked it. Then I masked the frame and started working on it outside on the back porch with plenty of newspaper underneath (make sure you do this in a well ventilated area and wear gloves, goggles and cover any surfaces you don’t want stained). Following the instructions I let it dry over night and then got some 000fine grade steal wool to buff the surface before adding the second coat. The next day after the second coat had dried I removed the masking tape from the decorative molding. I was dismayed to find that a few drops had leaked through under the edge of the masking tape. The instructions

Some Stain Leaked Through

Some Stain Leaked Through

said to use mineral spirits for cleanup. Since I was out of money for now, and had some gasoline (for my lawnmower) I used some of that instead dipping q-tips in it and scrubbing. I don’t know whether the mineral spirits would have worked better or if it had something to do with the polyurethane in the one step stain–but it left the wood slightly discolored. I think it was probably the gas, so I would not recommend it. Using an X-acto knife around the edges (where I had not tried to clean with gas) I was able to scrape or shave paper thin strips of the unwanted stained areas off with no problems as far as discoloration underneath. On the face of the molding I scraped the discolored areas that had been cleaned with gas. It helped a little, but not as much as I would like. I have had at least one person say they did not notice it, but I am contemplating painting

Leak through on the edge

Leak through on the edge

the discolored areas to match the natural color of the decorative molding. I don’t know if it will work or be worth it. I went ahead and sprayed it with multiple coats of clear glaze for now. I will definitely use a  different method for cleanup next time.

This has definitely been a learning experience. I originally started this as a review of how well Bob Villa’s frame plans (see part 1) would work for someone with very little woodworking experience, and on a tight budget. So far I have had to change some things and experiment on my own because he did not explain all the steps and go through all the way to the end of the completed project.

custom framing part 1, custom framing part 2, custom framing part 3, custom framing part 4, custom framing part 5

stay tuned for part 7 coming soon…
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Stained and Glossed

Stained and Glossed

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Yesterday I finally went to buy the foam board I needed for my framing project. I had priced an approximately 30X 40 sheet of acid free foamboard at Michael’s for about $10. They do also occasionally have 50% off coupons in the paper, but these exclude framing supplies. It turns out they did have an even larger size of foamboard for $15.99. Since it was about twice as big (about 40×60), I decided I would buy that one and have lots left over to frame some of my other art.

As with the matt board, I traced the outline of the glass onto the foamboard and cut it with the matt knife. Even with the knife blade fully extended, it did not go all the way through. I flipped it over and traced and cut it on the other side to get all the way through. If the foamboard does not quite fit in your frame, then try flipping it over from side to side or top to bottom or both. I still had to shave a little off one side after doing this to get mine to fit.

Bob Villa’s frame plans (see part 1) did not go into how to add the matboard and foamboard backing and secure them. I was planning on just using staples along the inner edge of the frame to wedge them into place, but my molding was too thin. The foamboard was flush with the back of the frame instead of leaving a little extra depth where I could stick some staples.

I need to come up with a different plan. I thought about just leaving it as is, because the foam was cut in such a way that it was so snug it would not fall out even when turned upside down and shaken. I went back to Michael’s thinking they probably have something designed to twist and lock the foamboard in place; however, I could not find anything. One of the ladies at the custom framing desk said since the foam board squishes that it would probably work to just squish it a bit and hold it in place with staples anyway.

I think before I secure everything in place I will select a stain and finish the frame. I’m thinking a nice cherry would look good. I am hoping to get some samples and stain some of the scraps first to make sure before  staining the whole thing.

In the meantime, here is an interesting article I found on framing watercolors.


low budget framing part 1,
stay tuned for part 6…

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how to draw oval #1I noticed several people found my series of posts about how to build your own custom frame by searching for how to cut an oval mat.  So, I thought I would write a more detailed article about how to draw or cut an oval. The easiest way would be if you already have an oval that you can trace. There are also several products available at art and craft stores that will cut a perfect oval;  however, these are a bit expensive (around $80 last time I checked) unless you need to cut a lot of ovals and need them exactly perfect.

how to draw an oval #2With some practice and a few simple tools you can get a pretty decent oval without breaking the bank. Most people probably already have all the necessary tools at home. You’ll need a pencil, ruler, scissors, eraser (optional), and some paper to practice with.

First fold your paper in half. Then fold it in half the other way–much like you would if you were going to make a paper snow flake. Measure half the width you would like your oval to be from the folded corner and mark that distance on the longer fold with your pencil. Next measure half the height you would like your oval to be, and mark it on the shorter fold. Now this is the part that will take practice: draw a curved line that connects the two marks and then unfold your paper. Be careful not to curve too sharply near the folds or you will end up with either a football or diamond shape. If you draw in a straight perpendicular line for about the first 1/4 inch or so it may help you avoid the temptation to curve too sharply.

how to cut an oval #4If after unfolding it, the oval does not look right there are several ways to fix it. You can either trim a little to round it more where the paper was folded, or place another paper under it ( or put tracing paper over it), then make corrections with your pencil on the uncut paper and try again. If you choose to trim the paper make sure it is folded or it will come out uneven and you will be unhappy with the results. Usually if I have an oval that did not turn out well it is because I tried to taper the oval too much near the fold. Try to stay as close to perpendicular near the fold to avoid having it look pointy when it is unfolded. Be patient and try this on scratch paper several times if necessary. It took time as a kid to learn how to cut hearts, circles, and snowflakes with ease, and with a little practice this will become easy to do.

Although this process does not always produce a perfect oval, with some practice you can make one that looks very good–all for the cost of several sheets of paper. Once you have a satisfactory oval, simply trace it onto the surface where you wanted it (such as your mat board or scrap book page), and VOILA–you just saved $80 on not having to buy a contraption to make one for you 😉

 

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
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matting1Once I had the frame assembled, I took it with me to my local art supply store to pick out matboard. Bringing the picture with me, in a protective sleeve, was also very helpful. After spending quite some time laying down different colored mats around the picture and laying the frame on top to see how it would look, I ended up choosing a kind of burgundy color which complemented both my artwork and the frame very nicely. The store had two options for buying matboard: I could either have them cut the mat and the opening for it for about $13 which would certainly have been convenient, or I could buy a very large sheet of matboard for about the same amount and cut it myself. I decided to buy the larger board and cut it myself so I would have some extra for other framingmatting2 projects. I also wanted to try cutting an oval freehand. The picture I am framing had a oval shape already drawn on it, but I drew it by hand– without a pattern– making it more of an egg shape. So It really would not have worked to have the store cut the matboard for me. I think the reason it was a little off from being an exact oval is that I trimmed the folded areas of my original pattern when it was not folded. See my post on making ovals for instructions. I think for this drawing the egg shape worked well though.

An artist friend of mine had offered to let me borrow her mat cutter, but could not find it. I have on previous occasions had a lot of experience with using Xacto knives for some pretty intricate cutting–so I thought maybe that would work if I was very careful. I laid the matboard on my clean kitchen table and lined the frame upmatting3 carefully with the corner of the board. then I traced the inner side of the frame with a pencil on the white side of the board, but tracing the glass would also have worked and probably been simpler now that I think of it LOL 😉 (good thing I can laugh at myself sometimes). I chose to cut starting on the reverse side of the mat because it is easier to hide mistakes that way. It was not the easiest thing in the world to cut through the mat with an Xacto knife, but it was possible after many passes over it. It did not look bad, and even if it had the edge of the frame will cover it by 1/4 inch.

matting7The tricky part was getting the oval. I got out some tracing paper I had on hand and traced my oval from the picture. If you are using a hand drawn oval rather than a pattern MAKE SURE TO MARK WHICH SIDE IS UP AND LEFT AND RIGHT, also make sure to make a note to yourself to FLIP IT OVER SIDEWAYS when you copy it to the back side of the matboard. I neglected to do this and it caused me a lot of grief and extra work. I had forgotten that the original oval I made on my drawing hadn’t turned out quite right at first and so I had trimmed it with the scissors while the pattern was not folded–which resulted in more of an ellipse). Copying the oval can be done several ways. either use a sheet of carbon paper matting34and trace it on, or cut out the oval and tape on the paper you cut it from, making sure to center it, and then trace. Cutting out the oval with the Xacto blade was much more difficult than doing a straight line. It might have been ok I I had remembered to mark and flip the pattern, but even then the cut was not as smooth as I would have liked. it’s extremely difficult cutting something that thick with an xacto and trying to keep the angle of the blade consistent.

matting 8I thought about remedying the situation by just cutting the board with a rectangular opening, but after getting a glimpse of how nice it would look with an oval I just couldn’t make myself do it. So, I started hunting for an inexpensive mat cutter. they can get pretty expensive up into the hundreds of dollars depending on what you want. A really basic model for cutting at either a 45 or 90 degree angle straight line runs anywhere from $50 or more. Freehand ones cost closer to 25, but the salesperson said that was not really any good for doing oval shapes with. Matcutters specifically designed for cutting ovals were matting5about $70. Ebay did have some mattcutters for much cheaper–anywhere from $10 and up mostly, but I was not sure how much shipping would be. Finally I went to another art store and found a mattcutter much like and Xacto knife, only much sharper. It also has a nice flat edge to rest it on while cutting. I had a coupon for 40% off and was able to get it for under $6. I still had to go over my cuts with it several times to get all the way through the board, but it was much easier. It was also much easier to hold the knife steady.

In order to fix the problem with having the oval flipped the wrong way , I enlarged the oval just about 1/8″(flipping it this time of course 🙂 ) then recut it. I taped my picture on the back with acid free tape, making sure to keep it level and centered.

***update*** 6/4/2012

I was just talking to a lady at a framing shop today, and she said to be sure to only attach the tape at the top, using a t hinge and attach it to the foam-board rather than the mat-board. You can make a t hinge by taking 2 strips of tape, and putting them, sticky sides together, in the shape of a T. I’ll take a photo of this to post later…

how to make ovals

matting6stay tuned for part 5…
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ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
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The next morning , after letting the glue dry overnight, I got to work removing the clamps. The thinner molding was of relatively soft wood and I was dismayed to find that the clamps had left a slight indent on it. Thinking back on watching Norm Abram’s show, New Yankee workshop, he would probably solve that problem by having a piece of concave wood to place between the clamp and the softer wood–which would equalize the pressure and prevent indentation. I don’t have the tools to make one of those though, and luckily it’s not very noticeable except for close up. I’ll need to come up with a easy low budget solution before my next framing project though.

The next step was to measure and cut at a 45 degree angle with the miter box. First cut off a small wedge at the end of your strip of glued molding. the inner edge with the small overlapping ledge will always be the short side. I used the edge of the Plexiglas to measure where to cut the wood, and marked it off in pencil on the inner edge of the narrow molding. If you’ve never heard the old adage “measure twice, cut once,” it’s still good advice. As I mentioned in part 2, I don’t have a workbench out in the shed to attach my miter box to, so I did this on the living room floor. If you choose to do it this way, make sure to hold on really tight to the molding and box with your non sawing hand so they don’t wiggle around. If you are not used to handling a saw, take it slow at first. Make sure to keep fingers etc away from the sharp end and if you might ruin your carpet or pergo flooring then put some cardboard or scrap wood under your work area. Keep the saw fairly level so you don’t end up sawing through the miter box. When making the second cut put the saw in the other slot so you end up with a trapezoid shape rather than a parallelogram. Check with each cut to make sure the sides all fit together nicely. Once all four pieces are cut then it’s time to glue again. If you have 2 corner clamps then you can do 2 corners one day and then put the 2 halves together the next day. making sure to allow them to dry overnight. ( make sure to glue the correct pieces together.)

Because I only had one corner clamp things got a bit interesting when I got to gluing the last piece on. I improvised by clamping one corner and wrapping multiple layers of yarn tightly in both directions for the remaining corner. I can’t say as I would recommend that though.

Even with all my measuring and remeasuring be fore cutting, somehow I ended up just a fraction of a millimeter off when it came to putting the last piece into the frame. I spent a lot of time sanding it down just right. The same thing happened with the glass. It was just a little too big to fit in the frame, so I spent a lot of time sanding both it and the frame, checking frequently until it would slide in comfortably. make sure to leave the plastic covering on both sides of the glass until you are done to prevent scratching the surface.

On to matting in part 4…

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custom framing 1As mentioned in part 1 of this article,part of my strategy to keep the costs down while building my frame was using as little tools as possible so I would not have to go out and buy a bunch of power tools. Another budget stretcher is to use what you already have, or borrow items from friends, relatives, or neighbors who may be into woodworking. You may even be able to get them to show you how to use it or to help you with your project. If you can, find wood scraps or recycled wood to use for your frame (check at home improvement stores or lumber yards. I have heard that construction sites are also good resources–just remember to ask. Craigslist sometimes has interesting items in the free section– scrap lumber is occasionally one of them.)

p1100227.jpgI took my a drawing to the hardware store with me, in a protective sleeve, to help me select a good width for the frame. Having the picture with me also helped to select a section of Plexiglas approximately 11 x 14 for a little under $3. I chose that size, which was slightly larger than my picture, rather than buying a larger sheet because glass cutters were about $12. Instead of buying glass cutters I left the Plexiglas as is and decided to mat the picture as well as framing it. They also had various sizes of regular glass, but if you have small children (or teenagers LOL) who constantly knock things off the walls Plexiglas is a must.

After choosing the Plexiglas, I bought 2 strips of molding. The wider piece needed to have a flat side (for gluing the other piece to) and to have a contour on the opposite edge. [see photo at top] The other, narrower, piece of molding was rounded and decoratively carved. I could not find any exactly like the ones Bob Villa used to make his frame, but that’s I really liked the ones I chose instead. Mine were approximately 7 feet long which was enough to make a frame with inner measurements of about 11×14″. I had about a foot or a foot and a half left over. When buying molding for your frame remember that each time you make a 45 degree cut for the corner there is going to be a triangle that you wont be able to use for the frame and you’ll need to buy extra to compensate for that. If you want to buy exactly how much you need you will have to dust off your high school geometry and use the Pythagorean theory to figure out how much extra to get (this will depend on how wide your molding is).

framing 2I have to admit I spent some time drooling over the power miter saws, unfortunately even on sale they were $60. What I ended up getting instead was a little plastic miter box that came with the saw all for about $8. I also bought 4 small c clamps about $2 each (make sure they work first I had to take one of mine back because it didn’t). I wished I had bought about 2 more. Make sure you have enough to place one every couple feet and that they open wide enough for the thickness of your molding. Corner clamps were about $10 each. I only bought one, but 2 are really necessary. I’ll explain why later.

I did not buy a nail setter or the 3/4 inch finishing nails, that Mr. Villa recommends, because the hardware store I was at did not have any that size. I think for the size frame I am making, especially with using a lightweight Plexiglas instead of glass, it should be ok without them. I’m sure I’ll find out the first time somebody knocks it off the wall.

framing 3I got the wood and tools home and started marking the wider piece of molding on the backside. I measured and marked every few inches with a clear ruler so that when I glued them together the skinnier piece would hang over creating a 1/4 inch ledge, and glued them together with some wood glue I already had on hand and clamped them together with 4 small C clamps and used the corner clamp also because 4 was not quite enough. For those of you with no garage or workshed to do this in, you can do this in the living room–however I would recommend waiting until anyone with curious little fingers are in bed for the night, and make sure to put down some newspaper or something to catch any drips or spills. Also, keep a damp cloth handy (ahead of time LOL) to wipe off any excess glue. Even though it is recommended to let the glue dry overnight, work quickly once you begin applying the glue. It does get tacky and difficult to adjust are in a relatively short amount of time.

part 3...

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

Ever had an odd sized work of art that you wanted framed only to experience some rather severe sticker shock when you went to a custom framing store and priced having it done? I have quite a few paintings of odd size hanging unframed on my walls for that very reason. ((ok so the word plethora comes to mind LOL) I am somewhat abashed to say mostly with thumb tacks.) Usually standard frame sizes have not been foremost on my mind when beginning a painting 😉

Over the past year several things have happened to motivate me to learn how to make my own custom frames. As part of my art business startup plan, I decided to ask local businesses if they would display some of my work. the hitch to this was that I did not have any frames to display them in publicly. So I bought some face paint and worked at the local farmers market to earn enough cash to hopefully at least get one frame. although I did earn enough to pay for the face paint and business cards I had printed up, it was sadly not enough to also pay for a custom made frame.

As a den leader for webelos scouts, one of the assignments was to have the boys make a picture frame. I had another leader, with more woodworking experience than me, help the boys make some rudimentary frames. I really wanted something a little more professional than what the boys came up with, and I had done some searching on line finding some interesting articles on building frames. Although it did not look terribly difficult to do, My budget and framing needs required that I do things a little differently. One article that was mentioned by the artist magazine’s blog had some really good instructions, but I needed to do things a bit differently because Watercolors must be framed behind glass or acrylic. There was another article that required having several routing bits to contour the frame. A router is definitely out of my budget range at the moment, although it did make some really nice frames. Then I found one by Bob Villa. Yes,THAT Bob Villa. His technique required fewer tools than the others. So I decided to give it a try ( after all he IS Bob Villa) and write an article on how it went. I am now done building the frame itself, and will be writing about it in stages as I bring my project to completion.

part 2 of this article…

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

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