You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘art for sale’ tag.

I have recently started posting t shirts for sale in my Redbubble gallery. It’s not as easy to do as it is in my zazzle gallery, since I had to find, download, and learn how to use a new to me photo/image editing program. Interestingly enough I found the program because of an article on zazzle’s blog about free alternatives to Photoshop. Based on several recommendations there I decided to try out paint.net. I had previously given some thought to trying out gimp, but was unsure of how to install it and get it to work on windows. So far I am enjoying paint.net, and with some patches available for download (the links are available in their forums), I have been able to do everything I have needed.
  I am still interested in getting my hands on one of those Correll paint pads I have heard so much about from other artists in artist magazine’s online art forums though. My one piece of digital art, Aeriel’s Gift, was really fun and exciting to do–but frustrating because doing any detail work was so painstakingly slow and difficult using a mouse. I would like to try doing more things like that in the future.

Here are the  t shirts I have for sale on redbubble so far. They are available on several different styles of  shirt as well as in multiple color choices.

9 X 12″ chalk on paper, 2009, by Dawna Morton. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Done entirely from memory in the space of about an hour, without referencing a photo, this large magenta colored flower sits on a moody background of expressive leaf shapes. in colors of green and purple, with hints of magenta, the foliage fans out around this striking flower like a burst of living flames.

Oil pastel crayon on paper, 9X12″ circa 1992. As Cinderella approaches the stairway to the castle, a glimpse of the prince at the ball is seen through a lighted window. Neither of them knowing what the future hold in store, it is a poignant moment filled with suspense and mystery.

Watercolor on paper, 9×12″, 2008. Along the borders of Gnat Creek Oregon a tiny white wildflower blooms in front of a rock, basking in the summer sunlight. I love the warmth of the sunlight on the mottled looking rock contrasted with the cool purplish shadows and the impressionistic background of lush vegetation.

  • Stargazer Lily in Pastel shirt by DlmtleArt
    Stargazer Lil…

    Oil pastel on paper, 9X12″, by Dawna Morton, 2009.
    Done entirely from memory without referencing a photo, this oil pastel drawing of a pink and white speckled stargazer lily on a brown background was completed in about an hour. the diagonal flow of this dynamic flower creates a vibrant energy.

    Button_view_buy

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

Advertisements

Oakridge Reservoir #1

Oakridge Reservoir #1 by Dawna Morton

Watercolor on Fabriano Uno 140 lb cold press paper, 7 1/2″ x 11″, 2001. A tangle of tree roots protrudes upward from the fallen tree and juts out towards the glassy water of Oakridge Reservoir. As the water begins to get deeper, algae and tree stumps seem to float, casting their suspended reflections. The peaceful water mirrors the distant shore of Oregon trees and mountains.

One in a series of four painting based on some photos I took while camping in Oakridge, Oregon, this beautiful watercolor painting features pale blue mountain ranges in an early morning sky reflected int the deep, tranquil blue water of Oakridge Reservoir, circling around through greener forested hills closer to the shore, a grouping of 2 stumps and a fallen log sticking out of the shallower water , and an uprooted tree jutting into the water from the unseen shore in the foreground.

Tags: , , ,

also on fineartamerica, Redbubble, and zazzle

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

Masking the Frame

Masking the Frame

Last week I decided it was time to pick out the stain for my framing project. So, I took my frame and artwork with me to Home Depot. Choosing the stain took  a long time. There were three different stains I thought might look good with it, but it was hard to tell which would be best based on the little swatches up on the shelf at the store. I finally went up to the paint desk and asked the sales clerk if she had some that I could hold up to the frame. She did have some, but not all 3 of the ones I wanted to see. Finally I chose Bombay Mahogany because it leaned a bit to the purple end of brown which I felt would complement the mat. The other 2 colors I had considered were Red Mahogany and Accents Antique Red. I really liked the antique red, but since it had to be mixed custom, it would not be returnable if I tested it and did not like it. Bombay Mahogany was only available in a 1 step formula (which would have been great except I was planning on leaving part of the frame unstained, and so I needed to put a coat of gloss on anyway).

Checking the Stain On Scrap Wood

Checking the Stain On Scrap Wood

I read all the instructions, and following them I shook the can before I opened it. Using a staining cloth which I already had on hand, I tested it on a small scrap leftover from the frame ( making sure to mask the lighter colored decorative molding first because I wanted to leave that part unstained). After applying 2 coats of stain I held it up next to the mat, deciding I liked it. Then I masked the frame and started working on it outside on the back porch with plenty of newspaper underneath (make sure you do this in a well ventilated area and wear gloves, goggles and cover any surfaces you don’t want stained). Following the instructions I let it dry over night and then got some 000fine grade steal wool to buff the surface before adding the second coat. The next day after the second coat had dried I removed the masking tape from the decorative molding. I was dismayed to find that a few drops had leaked through under the edge of the masking tape. The instructions

Some Stain Leaked Through

Some Stain Leaked Through

said to use mineral spirits for cleanup. Since I was out of money for now, and had some gasoline (for my lawnmower) I used some of that instead dipping q-tips in it and scrubbing. I don’t know whether the mineral spirits would have worked better or if it had something to do with the polyurethane in the one step stain–but it left the wood slightly discolored. I think it was probably the gas, so I would not recommend it. Using an X-acto knife around the edges (where I had not tried to clean with gas) I was able to scrape or shave paper thin strips of the unwanted stained areas off with no problems as far as discoloration underneath. On the face of the molding I scraped the discolored areas that had been cleaned with gas. It helped a little, but not as much as I would like. I have had at least one person say they did not notice it, but I am contemplating painting

Leak through on the edge

Leak through on the edge

the discolored areas to match the natural color of the decorative molding. I don’t know if it will work or be worth it. I went ahead and sprayed it with multiple coats of clear glaze for now. I will definitely use a  different method for cleanup next time.

This has definitely been a learning experience. I originally started this as a review of how well Bob Villa’s frame plans (see part 1) would work for someone with very little woodworking experience, and on a tight budget. So far I have had to change some things and experiment on my own because he did not explain all the steps and go through all the way to the end of the completed project.

custom framing part 1, custom framing part 2, custom framing part 3, custom framing part 4, custom framing part 5

stay tuned for part 7 coming soon…
Dawna’ Fine Art Prints at Imagekind.com
Dawna’s Art and Photography at Buy my art
Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring Dawna’s work.

Stained and Glossed

Stained and Glossed

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

Over the 4th of July my family went fishing at Gnat Creek. My part of the fishing trip was, as usual to take lots and lots of reference photos 🙂 . I noticed some really tiny little white wildflowers next to a splotchy mottled rock. It was pretty in the sunlight. I took a couple of close up photos for use later.

A couple days ago I went to a friends house to have an “art day.” Although I did look at the photos briefly to refresh my memory, I chose to put them away and paint entirely from memory. This was much more fun than trying to paint photographically, freeing me up to be more creative and play with compositional changes.

I went with purple for the shadows, and an impressionistic green and purple background. A touch of yellow highlights and also some yellow to warm up the rock tie things together. I limited the palette to brown, purple, green, yellow, and white. The purple flowers in the background were added on a bit of a whim. (Yeah, I have a weakness for purple 😉 ) splattering in paint on different area of the wet rock to create the splotchy texture was really enjoyable too. The finished painting is 9×12″

 

Here are the reference photos. Notice the really interesting pattern on the rock. It makes a lovely background. I’m particularly fond of the close up shot. It has a good contrast between the warm tones of the rock and the cool colors of the flowers.

.

.

All images in this blog are the intellectual property of Dawna Morton. All Rights Reserved. Do not copy in any form.

All Rights Reserved. Do not Copy.

Dawna’s Buy my art Gallery of greeting cards and Matted Prints.

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Yesterday I finally went to buy the foam board I needed for my framing project. I had priced an approximately 30X 40 sheet of acid free foamboard at Michael’s for about $10. They do also occasionally have 50% off coupons in the paper, but these exclude framing supplies. It turns out they did have an even larger size of foamboard for $15.99. Since it was about twice as big (about 40×60), I decided I would buy that one and have lots left over to frame some of my other art.

As with the matt board, I traced the outline of the glass onto the foamboard and cut it with the matt knife. Even with the knife blade fully extended, it did not go all the way through. I flipped it over and traced and cut it on the other side to get all the way through. If the foamboard does not quite fit in your frame, then try flipping it over from side to side or top to bottom or both. I still had to shave a little off one side after doing this to get mine to fit.

Bob Villa’s frame plans (see part 1) did not go into how to add the matboard and foamboard backing and secure them. I was planning on just using staples along the inner edge of the frame to wedge them into place, but my molding was too thin. The foamboard was flush with the back of the frame instead of leaving a little extra depth where I could stick some staples.

I need to come up with a different plan. I thought about just leaving it as is, because the foam was cut in such a way that it was so snug it would not fall out even when turned upside down and shaken. I went back to Michael’s thinking they probably have something designed to twist and lock the foamboard in place; however, I could not find anything. One of the ladies at the custom framing desk said since the foam board squishes that it would probably work to just squish it a bit and hold it in place with staples anyway.

I think before I secure everything in place I will select a stain and finish the frame. I’m thinking a nice cherry would look good. I am hoping to get some samples and stain some of the scraps first to make sure before  staining the whole thing.

In the meantime, here is an interesting article I found on framing watercolors.


low budget framing part 1,
stay tuned for part 6…

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints

Gift items featuring Dawna’s Art and Photography

 

All Rights Reserved. Do not Copy.

Dawna’s Buy my art Gallery of greeting cards and Matted Prints.

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

matting1Once I had the frame assembled, I took it with me to my local art supply store to pick out matboard. Bringing the picture with me, in a protective sleeve, was also very helpful. After spending quite some time laying down different colored mats around the picture and laying the frame on top to see how it would look, I ended up choosing a kind of burgundy color which complemented both my artwork and the frame very nicely. The store had two options for buying matboard: I could either have them cut the mat and the opening for it for about $13 which would certainly have been convenient, or I could buy a very large sheet of matboard for about the same amount and cut it myself. I decided to buy the larger board and cut it myself so I would have some extra for other framingmatting2 projects. I also wanted to try cutting an oval freehand. The picture I am framing had a oval shape already drawn on it, but I drew it by hand– without a pattern– making it more of an egg shape. So It really would not have worked to have the store cut the matboard for me. I think the reason it was a little off from being an exact oval is that I trimmed the folded areas of my original pattern when it was not folded. See my post on making ovals for instructions. I think for this drawing the egg shape worked well though.

An artist friend of mine had offered to let me borrow her mat cutter, but could not find it. I have on previous occasions had a lot of experience with using Xacto knives for some pretty intricate cutting–so I thought maybe that would work if I was very careful. I laid the matboard on my clean kitchen table and lined the frame upmatting3 carefully with the corner of the board. then I traced the inner side of the frame with a pencil on the white side of the board, but tracing the glass would also have worked and probably been simpler now that I think of it LOL 😉 (good thing I can laugh at myself sometimes). I chose to cut starting on the reverse side of the mat because it is easier to hide mistakes that way. It was not the easiest thing in the world to cut through the mat with an Xacto knife, but it was possible after many passes over it. It did not look bad, and even if it had the edge of the frame will cover it by 1/4 inch.

matting7The tricky part was getting the oval. I got out some tracing paper I had on hand and traced my oval from the picture. If you are using a hand drawn oval rather than a pattern MAKE SURE TO MARK WHICH SIDE IS UP AND LEFT AND RIGHT, also make sure to make a note to yourself to FLIP IT OVER SIDEWAYS when you copy it to the back side of the matboard. I neglected to do this and it caused me a lot of grief and extra work. I had forgotten that the original oval I made on my drawing hadn’t turned out quite right at first and so I had trimmed it with the scissors while the pattern was not folded–which resulted in more of an ellipse). Copying the oval can be done several ways. either use a sheet of carbon paper matting34and trace it on, or cut out the oval and tape on the paper you cut it from, making sure to center it, and then trace. Cutting out the oval with the Xacto blade was much more difficult than doing a straight line. It might have been ok I I had remembered to mark and flip the pattern, but even then the cut was not as smooth as I would have liked. it’s extremely difficult cutting something that thick with an xacto and trying to keep the angle of the blade consistent.

matting 8I thought about remedying the situation by just cutting the board with a rectangular opening, but after getting a glimpse of how nice it would look with an oval I just couldn’t make myself do it. So, I started hunting for an inexpensive mat cutter. they can get pretty expensive up into the hundreds of dollars depending on what you want. A really basic model for cutting at either a 45 or 90 degree angle straight line runs anywhere from $50 or more. Freehand ones cost closer to 25, but the salesperson said that was not really any good for doing oval shapes with. Matcutters specifically designed for cutting ovals were matting5about $70. Ebay did have some mattcutters for much cheaper–anywhere from $10 and up mostly, but I was not sure how much shipping would be. Finally I went to another art store and found a mattcutter much like and Xacto knife, only much sharper. It also has a nice flat edge to rest it on while cutting. I had a coupon for 40% off and was able to get it for under $6. I still had to go over my cuts with it several times to get all the way through the board, but it was much easier. It was also much easier to hold the knife steady.

In order to fix the problem with having the oval flipped the wrong way , I enlarged the oval just about 1/8″(flipping it this time of course 🙂 ) then recut it. I taped my picture on the back with acid free tape, making sure to keep it level and centered.

***update*** 6/4/2012

I was just talking to a lady at a framing shop today, and she said to be sure to only attach the tape at the top, using a t hinge and attach it to the foam-board rather than the mat-board. You can make a t hinge by taking 2 strips of tape, and putting them, sticky sides together, in the shape of a T. I’ll take a photo of this to post later…

how to make ovals

matting6stay tuned for part 5…
Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

The next morning , after letting the glue dry overnight, I got to work removing the clamps. The thinner molding was of relatively soft wood and I was dismayed to find that the clamps had left a slight indent on it. Thinking back on watching Norm Abram’s show, New Yankee workshop, he would probably solve that problem by having a piece of concave wood to place between the clamp and the softer wood–which would equalize the pressure and prevent indentation. I don’t have the tools to make one of those though, and luckily it’s not very noticeable except for close up. I’ll need to come up with a easy low budget solution before my next framing project though.

The next step was to measure and cut at a 45 degree angle with the miter box. First cut off a small wedge at the end of your strip of glued molding. the inner edge with the small overlapping ledge will always be the short side. I used the edge of the Plexiglas to measure where to cut the wood, and marked it off in pencil on the inner edge of the narrow molding. If you’ve never heard the old adage “measure twice, cut once,” it’s still good advice. As I mentioned in part 2, I don’t have a workbench out in the shed to attach my miter box to, so I did this on the living room floor. If you choose to do it this way, make sure to hold on really tight to the molding and box with your non sawing hand so they don’t wiggle around. If you are not used to handling a saw, take it slow at first. Make sure to keep fingers etc away from the sharp end and if you might ruin your carpet or pergo flooring then put some cardboard or scrap wood under your work area. Keep the saw fairly level so you don’t end up sawing through the miter box. When making the second cut put the saw in the other slot so you end up with a trapezoid shape rather than a parallelogram. Check with each cut to make sure the sides all fit together nicely. Once all four pieces are cut then it’s time to glue again. If you have 2 corner clamps then you can do 2 corners one day and then put the 2 halves together the next day. making sure to allow them to dry overnight. ( make sure to glue the correct pieces together.)

Because I only had one corner clamp things got a bit interesting when I got to gluing the last piece on. I improvised by clamping one corner and wrapping multiple layers of yarn tightly in both directions for the remaining corner. I can’t say as I would recommend that though.

Even with all my measuring and remeasuring be fore cutting, somehow I ended up just a fraction of a millimeter off when it came to putting the last piece into the frame. I spent a lot of time sanding it down just right. The same thing happened with the glass. It was just a little too big to fit in the frame, so I spent a lot of time sanding both it and the frame, checking frequently until it would slide in comfortably. make sure to leave the plastic covering on both sides of the glass until you are done to prevent scratching the surface.

On to matting in part 4…

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

custom framing 1As mentioned in part 1 of this article,part of my strategy to keep the costs down while building my frame was using as little tools as possible so I would not have to go out and buy a bunch of power tools. Another budget stretcher is to use what you already have, or borrow items from friends, relatives, or neighbors who may be into woodworking. You may even be able to get them to show you how to use it or to help you with your project. If you can, find wood scraps or recycled wood to use for your frame (check at home improvement stores or lumber yards. I have heard that construction sites are also good resources–just remember to ask. Craigslist sometimes has interesting items in the free section– scrap lumber is occasionally one of them.)

p1100227.jpgI took my a drawing to the hardware store with me, in a protective sleeve, to help me select a good width for the frame. Having the picture with me also helped to select a section of Plexiglas approximately 11 x 14 for a little under $3. I chose that size, which was slightly larger than my picture, rather than buying a larger sheet because glass cutters were about $12. Instead of buying glass cutters I left the Plexiglas as is and decided to mat the picture as well as framing it. They also had various sizes of regular glass, but if you have small children (or teenagers LOL) who constantly knock things off the walls Plexiglas is a must.

After choosing the Plexiglas, I bought 2 strips of molding. The wider piece needed to have a flat side (for gluing the other piece to) and to have a contour on the opposite edge. [see photo at top] The other, narrower, piece of molding was rounded and decoratively carved. I could not find any exactly like the ones Bob Villa used to make his frame, but that’s I really liked the ones I chose instead. Mine were approximately 7 feet long which was enough to make a frame with inner measurements of about 11×14″. I had about a foot or a foot and a half left over. When buying molding for your frame remember that each time you make a 45 degree cut for the corner there is going to be a triangle that you wont be able to use for the frame and you’ll need to buy extra to compensate for that. If you want to buy exactly how much you need you will have to dust off your high school geometry and use the Pythagorean theory to figure out how much extra to get (this will depend on how wide your molding is).

framing 2I have to admit I spent some time drooling over the power miter saws, unfortunately even on sale they were $60. What I ended up getting instead was a little plastic miter box that came with the saw all for about $8. I also bought 4 small c clamps about $2 each (make sure they work first I had to take one of mine back because it didn’t). I wished I had bought about 2 more. Make sure you have enough to place one every couple feet and that they open wide enough for the thickness of your molding. Corner clamps were about $10 each. I only bought one, but 2 are really necessary. I’ll explain why later.

I did not buy a nail setter or the 3/4 inch finishing nails, that Mr. Villa recommends, because the hardware store I was at did not have any that size. I think for the size frame I am making, especially with using a lightweight Plexiglas instead of glass, it should be ok without them. I’m sure I’ll find out the first time somebody knocks it off the wall.

framing 3I got the wood and tools home and started marking the wider piece of molding on the backside. I measured and marked every few inches with a clear ruler so that when I glued them together the skinnier piece would hang over creating a 1/4 inch ledge, and glued them together with some wood glue I already had on hand and clamped them together with 4 small C clamps and used the corner clamp also because 4 was not quite enough. For those of you with no garage or workshed to do this in, you can do this in the living room–however I would recommend waiting until anyone with curious little fingers are in bed for the night, and make sure to put down some newspaper or something to catch any drips or spills. Also, keep a damp cloth handy (ahead of time LOL) to wipe off any excess glue. Even though it is recommended to let the glue dry overnight, work quickly once you begin applying the glue. It does get tacky and difficult to adjust are in a relatively short amount of time.

part 3...

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

Ever had an odd sized work of art that you wanted framed only to experience some rather severe sticker shock when you went to a custom framing store and priced having it done? I have quite a few paintings of odd size hanging unframed on my walls for that very reason. ((ok so the word plethora comes to mind LOL) I am somewhat abashed to say mostly with thumb tacks.) Usually standard frame sizes have not been foremost on my mind when beginning a painting 😉

Over the past year several things have happened to motivate me to learn how to make my own custom frames. As part of my art business startup plan, I decided to ask local businesses if they would display some of my work. the hitch to this was that I did not have any frames to display them in publicly. So I bought some face paint and worked at the local farmers market to earn enough cash to hopefully at least get one frame. although I did earn enough to pay for the face paint and business cards I had printed up, it was sadly not enough to also pay for a custom made frame.

As a den leader for webelos scouts, one of the assignments was to have the boys make a picture frame. I had another leader, with more woodworking experience than me, help the boys make some rudimentary frames. I really wanted something a little more professional than what the boys came up with, and I had done some searching on line finding some interesting articles on building frames. Although it did not look terribly difficult to do, My budget and framing needs required that I do things a little differently. One article that was mentioned by the artist magazine’s blog had some really good instructions, but I needed to do things a bit differently because Watercolors must be framed behind glass or acrylic. There was another article that required having several routing bits to contour the frame. A router is definitely out of my budget range at the moment, although it did make some really nice frames. Then I found one by Bob Villa. Yes,THAT Bob Villa. His technique required fewer tools than the others. So I decided to give it a try ( after all he IS Bob Villa) and write an article on how it went. I am now done building the frame itself, and will be writing about it in stages as I bring my project to completion.

part 2 of this article…

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

I always used to think I was no good at setting and achieving goals. I have come to the realization that I just did not know how to get from the goal setting stage to actually achieving the goal. It never occurred to me when I was younger that what was stopping me from attaining my goals was not having a plan of action, or in other words not breaking it down into smaller steps that would eventually get me there.

For a long time I have wanted to be an artist, but did not think it was possible to make any money on it in the near future. About six months ago I decided to quit listening to my own negative self talk and start believing that it is possible for me to be a real honest to goodness getting paid for it artist. I quit listening to my own excuses. I had told myself that I did not “have time” to paint, or I didn’t deserve to paint ( because the house was a mess), or it won’t sell anyway, so why bother?

What led to this drastic change in my attitude?

Well, first of all, a catastrophe of sorts happened in our family. Things had been going great, we had just bought our first house and a brand new car. Life was good. We even had a dog. Then the proverbial “stuff’ hit the proverbial fan. My wonderful hardworking husband got news that his employer was closing their doors and he would be out of a job. He looked really hard for work, but there just wasn’t anything in our area in his area of expertise that paid anywhere near what he had been making before. After a few months of that, I quit being a stay at home mom and and got a job through a temp agency locally so we could afford to send him to a vocational school. The original plan was to have me work for just a month or two until he could get us back on our feet financially. A few months turned into almost a year.

The first temp agency looked at my application and nearly laughed me out of their office. I was humiliated. I am a hard worker, really. but I have put a high value on raising my own kids, so the few “real” jobs I have had were temporary and few and far between. I went to a second agency and in shear desperation took a swing shift job that required repetitive lifting of up to 50 lbs by myself and up to 100 lbs with help. I have a mild case of scoliosis, so many of my family were very concerned that I might injure my back doing that kind of lifting. With lots of daily stretching before work ( and a lot of prayer) I managed to make it without throwing out my back. Anyway long story short, I figured if I was capable of doing that, I was capable of making my way as an artist–no matter how impossible it might seem. I also was highly motivated to find a way to help support our family without all the hassle of finding and keeping a reliable babysitter. Being out in the workforce had also taken a big toll on the kids and their performance in school.

During the year I spent working I would spend my free time –what little of it there was– brushing up my art skills through reading books on drawing and composition. Sometimes I visited online art forums and got advice from others about what steps to take when starting an art business. When I got off work early enough, and wasn’t too tired, I would work on a painting.

I had recently learned that I was capable of setting and achieving goals instead of just setting the goal and beating myself up emotionally when nothing happened. I had set a goal to lose 50lbs in 1 year. I got about halfway there in the course of a year on my own, and then I found a place called Sparkpeople.com which helped me learn more about achieving my goals and got me the rest of the way to my goal weight plus a little more. I also had a goal to improve the cleanliness of my home. I’m still working on that through a program called flylady.net, but I am seeing visible progress–which is a wonderful thing.

So, I started baby stepping into it. I bought some face paint and got some business cards (an investment of about 35.00 in all), then I borrowed a gazebo from a friend and set up shop at the local farmers market. I didn’t make very much money off of it, but it was a good chance to pass out business cards and do some networking. I also signed up for a place called Imagekind.com in order to sell some prints of my work. I added a link to my Imagekind gallery in my email signature. It was surprising to find how many of my friends and family members did not know I was an artist. A few months later I set up an account with Zazzle.com to put some of my art on things like greeting cards, tee shirts, and mugs.

One of the pieces of advice I had been getting pretty consistently from other artists was to get a blog. I have to admit I was really dragging my feet on this one. It sounded like a LOT of work to figure out how to do one, and then a lot of work to keep it going. Finally I decided to take the plunge and spent several days looking into different sites and comparing options. I really needed something free -or at least pretty close to it — for now. I was hoping to find something in that price range that would allow me to both have a web site and a blog all together, because I felt like that would be less work for me to keep up and make things simpler as far a the number of web links for people to check out. I also wanted to either have no advertising on it or be able to have control over which ads were there (and then get paid for them). Oh, and it had to be easy to use (might as well dream big while I’m dreaming, right?).

I spent enough time with all the comparisons that I’m surprised I didn’t go cross eyed, but I finally decided to go with wordpress.com. Although I had heard quite a few people say they really like blogger.com because it was fairly easy to do, I had also heard from many others that they got lots of spam on it. I’m not too keen on getting spam myself. I had asked around on the forum at Imagekind and one of the people, who is also a respected author, said he uses wordpress and then hosts it on his own server, so he can write his own html and have adds that he gets paid for. I decided against hosting my blog on a separate server because of the cost for now, but I figure this using wordpress’s free blog will help me take that step when I am ready because I will already be familiar with their programming. Then I can go after my own advertisers if I want to, which I wouldn’t mind as long as I have complete control over what ads are on my blog.

It’s taken me 2 weeks to get my gallery and my bio page up and running, but I now officially have my own blog. My advice is if you have a dream, Go get it! Woo hoo! Now on to the next step in my quest to achieve my dreams…

Images and content on this blog are the intellectual property of  Dawna Morton.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Do not copy.
Dawna’s Buy               my art Gallery of Greeting Cards, Matted Prints, and T-shirts at RedBubble Buy               art

Dawna’s Fine Art Prints at imagekind.com

Dawna’s Zazzle Gallery of items featuring her Art and Photography

Dawna’s art on FineArtAmerica

Dawna’s art on Amazon

Visit Dawna’s fan page and become a fan on facebook!

see Dawna’s art & photography with the poetry of Glennis Roper
http://PoemsProseAndArtistry.imagekind.com/
http://www.zazzle.com/poemsproseartistry*
http://www.redbubble.com/people/poemsproseart

Buy my t-shirts

 

You can also find Dawna on flickr

 

Dawna’s Facebook Fan Page

Dawna’s RedBubble Gallery

Buy my art

Dawna’s tweets

Top Clicks

  • None
%d bloggers like this: